Personality Type by Third Degree Question

Might I be able to identify a personality type by dominant usage of Third Degree of Illumination question type? Referring to our 4-question model of inquiry:

  • A What type might focus more on things, ideas, etc.;
  • A How type might focus more on ways and means, goals, and methodologies – engineering;
  • A Why type might focus more on emotions, empathy, and certainty;
  • A Who type might focus more on interpersonal relationships, authoritarianism, etc. –

Might a long list of personality characteristics be made from these? I wonder.

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Convincing Words and the Third Degree

I tend to use the word, “so” as one of several convincing words to end questioning. Same with the words, “because” and “then” – transition words that move a concept from consideration to conclusion. I use them as Second Degree of Illumination defense to avoid Third Degree of Illumination inquiry and convince myself of my rightness within my First-Second Degree of Illumination bubble.

I use convincing words to invoke consensus as a defense and to halt further investigation. As a conjunction, the word “so” means, “and for this reason; therefore.” (Google) “Because” as conjunction means, “for the reason that; since.” (Google) “Then” and “therefore” conjunctions essentially mean the same as “so”.

Convincing Words and the End of Inquiry

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No Time Like the Present

I have questions in the present that challenge my certainty of a past I’ve used to justify the present. The more I consider the usefulness of self-inquiry, the more questions I have and the less confident I feel in my defense of time, as I understand it, as authoritative.

One question can start me on a path to awakening, “Do I need to be right?” This could be the result of an interaction I had with someone recently in which I was sure I was right about a position and just as sure that that someone was wrong. I backed up my points with proof as did they. Their side seemed equally logical, but I realized I had strong emotions on my side that boosted my need even further with convincing energy.

“Nobody is ever convinced of anything until they FEEL convinced, and if you can get them to FEEL convinced, you can convince them of anything.” (Scott Bryant concerning Group Manipulation)

When my emotions get involved, pain doesn’t seem to be an obstacle! Rather, it serves to prove my point – to me!

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HOW Does My Dimension of Belief Work?

I believe a lot of things – and trust my senses, which are not always reliable sources of accurate information. I believe that what I perceive IS what IS. Yet, I occasionally make sensual, judgmental, and thinking errors – optical illusions, incorrectly heard communications, biases and prejudices, and etc.

Sometimes what SEEMS to be is not what it SEEMS to be.

It SEEMS to me that I’m sensing a lot of “what is” – rocks, houses, my glasses, the sound of the truck outside my office, and etc. — “WHAT is that?” I ask. “SomeTHING, that’s WHAT!” I answer.

In Second Degree Illumination, I justify “things” with reasons WHY they are as I perceive them. My need to know WHY satisfied, I go on to justify HOW my justification is correct. This keeps me safely inside First Degree Illumination.

To get beyond the First-Second Degree bubble, I could ASK a question that elicits more questions – particularly those that question the question. While at the edge of the bubble, answering questions tends to serve to satisfy my need to know – delivering me back into the First-Second Degree safety bubble.

As I begin to question my trust in my senses, thinking, and beliefs, let’s investigate the relationship between WHAT and HOW in my world of perception…

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Why Speed-Reading of People Is a Biased Assumption

Living in defense demands that I quickly form survival impressions and act on them accordingly – speed being an essential element.

Because I believe threats to my safety exist at all levels of my being, can I afford not to speed-read my environment?

The need for speed may be an ancient survival aspect of instinct in which fast action was vital to life. I still find this aspect useful in the fast-paced modern world I live in today. My ego uses bias – a heuristic, a shortcut in which I rely on the meme, “good enough, fast enough.”

I infuse my biased assumptions with essentialism. I categorize people and things according  to my perception of their essential nature, in spite of variations.

My biased programs apply physical signs of threat to non-physical levels. For example, I might see all persons larger than me as threatening.

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