Black and White, Grayscale, and Color Thinking

He uses colorful language. That’s colorful thinking. The world is so gray today. He sees the world in black and white. Such a colorful perspective! In bubble awareness, I visually sense a range of frequencies, amplitudes, and conditions. These match closely to modes of thinking.

Black and White

I’ve experienced the world in black or white binary in which I insist on only this way or that way. Once I was job hunting and went to an interview with the owner of a shop I wanted to work in. The owner told me, “There’s only two ways in this shop: my way or the highway.” I looked elsewhere for a job. Both he and I were viewing our world in the duality of binary thinking. On OR off, zero OR one, this OR that.

Right OR wrong thinking is one dimensional: the world of “only.” To the degree I MUST be right, proper, or justified, I’ll see the world in only black or white. This way of thinking limits my world to the contrast of borders that define my reality.

Monochrome

Monochrome grayscale adds more flexibility to binary thinking. In grayscale, I can experience how much. I can experience some anger, some happiness, some agreement, some of this or some of that. Grayscale thinking adds the shading of intensity to my world.

Color

Color adds emotion to monochrome that may represent the conflicts I experience as I work to defend binary thinking in terms of inclusion – this and that. You see (pardon the pun), color perception includes elements of binary and monochrome – definition and intensity and relationship.

In digital terms:

  • I can express black or white in terms of zero OR one on a scale of 1. ex: 0=black, 1=white on a scale of 0-1
  • Grayscale in terms of zero or one on a scale greater than one. ex: 00=black, 11=dark gray, 22= light gray, 33=white on a scale of 0-3 in each position
  • Color in terms of zeroes and ones on a scale greater than 1. ex: 001=dark blue, 010=dark green, 500=bright red, 550=bright yellow, and etc. on a scale of 0-5 in each position rrr-ggg-bbb

In psychological terms, I ask questions in order after encountering something:

  1. Black and white – Is that which I’ve encountered a threat or benefit to me/us (Yes/No)?
  2. Monochrome – How much of a threat or benefit is it (on an imaginary scale based on values)?
  3. Color – when items 1 and 2 are satisfied, what are nuances of interest, such as emotion and wonder?

Black may be considered the construct upon which all else builds. It’s the zero condition, nothingness, primal. Anything added to black, other than black, builds something.

White is what one gets when they add all colors together – it represents all. To get monochrome or color, one must subtract from white or add to black.

Because I see color, I realize that I see less than all and more than nothingness. I see separation from poles – the middle way.

Measuring Values Creates Polarity

In a First-Second Degree of Illumination bubble, values rule! Values and comparisons seem to work well together. I don’t think I would have the ability to choose without them.

Comparing values may be an ambiguous, non-standardized way for measuring what deserves my attention. To make a measurement, one needs a scale upon which to make a comparison. Scales involve polarity.

One type of scale requires polarities that define the outer limits or extent of the most extreme expected measurement. Another requires a balance point between two polarities. Each type of scale requires common content and context in which to make a measurement. Hence, the old saying, “You can’t compare apples to oranges…”

I seek what validates my preset values. The amount of attention I invest in a thing is the measurement of its value on that preset scale. In this way I can compare worthiness in terms of threats and benefits to my survival on a scale I understand.

Chronic value measuring keeps my mind occupied in creating and maintaining a standard, a quick reference guide to survival. At the top of my standards list is the greatest threat or benefit to my survival.

My need to be right creates polarity and a lifetime of measuring values

I believe I know how I should understand my reality. I have learned to trust my ability to measure values and accept them as accurate and true.

Polarity demands certitude

When I get close to certainty of my value judgments, I’m getting dangerously close to valuing myself at one end or pole of that scale. The closer my attention is to the poles of my value scale, the less likely I am to be fluid with my measurements, and the more likely I am to become certain and immovable. Certitude tends to lock down my scale – including its polarities.

To investigate this phenomenon, I like to get quiet and ask my inner wisdom:

  1. What do I value?
  2. How do I measure it?
  3. Why do I measure it?
  4. Who am I as I move towards polarity?

By asking these questions within, my deeper mind can search for its truths and help my conscious mind…

  • know and understand the real me.
  • reveal misunderstandings I’ve created that have supported a false me.
  • stop measuring myself, knowing I need no setting of values.

My Reflexive Reality

Inside my First-Second Degree of Illumination bubble, I live in a reflexive reality. By reflexive, I mean that which refers back to itself without conscious thought. For example, before I’m consciously aware of it, I perceive a need in myself, I create a way to fill that need. I then justify that need with the means I use for its fulfillment.

From a thought/action perspective, I set intentions based on choices before those intentions ever manifest as physical reality. The more convinced I am of who I think I am, the more my reality reflects those intentions, which begin to look like more clearly defined patterns. These patterns of reality manifest as reflexive characteristics that further convince me that I was right about who I think I am. Self-referential and without conscious thought.

Questioning my reflexive reality

Reflexive questions inside the bubble –

  1. What do I need? – (I identify with my need)
  2. How do I intend to fulfill it? (I take action on my need)
  3. Why do I need to defend what I need? (I justify my need)
  4. Who am I as a result of defending my need? (I am my need)

What if I question those questions? Would I release my need for a reflexive reality and expand my thoughts to Third Degree of Illumination? What might happen if I asked at the end of each question, “Is that true?” For example –

  1. What do I need? – (I identify with my need) “Is that true?”
  2. How do I intend to fulfill it? (I take action on my need) “Is that true?”
  3. Why do I need to defend what I need? (I justify my need) “Is that true?”
  4. Who am I as a result of defending my need? (I am my need) “Is that true?”

When I can honestly answer these questions with a “NO,” I can move to accountability in Fourth Degree of Illumination.

Is My Reality a Metaphoric Story of My Beliefs?

Might my conscious awareness of “reality” be an expression of my beliefs? Do you, me, everyone, and everything I perceive exist as imagined dream characters, representational symbols of my beliefs?

From birth, I have developed filters that keep my mind on track with beliefs – safe within my “comfort zones.” Occasionally, life’s experiences challenge that safety and my mind gets to choose. Once I make the choice to live within a comfort zone, the ability to choose fades from my consciousness, the blinders go on and my limited imagination is left to defend a fearful creator – (me). Any wonder Caroline Casey quipped, “Believe nothing, entertain possibilities?”

Read more Is My Reality a Metaphoric Story of My Beliefs?

Truth and Inaccuracy, Right and Wrong

How everything is true and I perceive it inaccurately. Rightness and wrongness, then, may be irrelevant.

This morning, Carol and I sat at our huge picture window overlooking our back yard – wondering. We wondered about the scene before us. Birds crisscrossed our visual field to land in trees adorned with bare limbs serving as perches. Grass hummed below us with the inaudible sound of a million insect steps. We marveled at the vastness of creation that presented itself so verdantly before us.

“It’s an illusion,” we reminded each other, entranced by it all. “And yet, it seems so real.”

Then I recalled three things I’ve been pondering lately:

  • Hoffman’s theory of Conscious Agents in which I came to realize that I don’t perceive the world as it is – rather, I perceive it as I NEED to perceive it in order to be fit enough for my genes to survive into the next generation.
  • Presentations of quantum physics has demonstrated that matter, space, may not exist as I perceive it.
  • Other presentations lead me to believe that time, too, may not exist as I perceive it.

And yet, there it is before me! Time, space, and consciousness coming together to experience… what? Reality? No, can’t be – reality only exists when there is a conscious agent to witness it. My beliefs? Ah, maybe…

Read more Truth and Inaccuracy, Right and Wrong