Bridging Dimensions with Imagination

Within my First-Second Degree of Illumination bubble awareness, my imagination creates equations to help me span a broad spectrum of phenomena that appear to be unrelated. Then, I bridge the physical and nonphysical dimensions with these equations to derive meaning. My equations weave forms and their functions into a tapestry of perspective that holds my story together.

Meaningful Equations

Dimensions that have nothing in common can interact with each other through my imagination. Thus, my imagined equations help me cross realities to form one story. They can also separate one story into many realities as I desire. Equations are two-way streets. Nice!

For example, I might break my physical leg, which physical injury may present a metaphor for my psychological world. The literal experience, though separate and apart from my psychological experience of it, combines to form one meaningful story. Thanks to imagination, separate and apart come together as one cohesive story.

One example of such an equation –
An old house is capable of being physically abandoned = I am capable of being emotionally abandoned. I’ve spanned the equation with MEANING.

More examples in which I bridge physical to non-physical forms and functions with equations of meaning:

  • Physical – Meaning – Non-physical
  • House – Home – Sense of security
  • People – Connection – Relationship
  • School building – Potential – Learning
  • Coin – Value – Money

Identity Fuels my Need for Meaning

My need for meaning fuels my imagination that spans dimensions. This reconciles the apparent impossible merging of disparate realities into a single experience. Thus confirming who I believe I am from who I believe I am not. Logic solved!

I set up imaginary barriers to contain my sense of being out of control. To give me a sense of separation between who I am vs who I am not (me vs not me), I do the same. Through imagination, my equations make sense out of this chaos. A means of satisfying my need to be safe by imagining I am in control of the impossible equation.

Equations allow me to feel for anything in the physical world as though it were literally me – all the while keeping physical identities separate. For example, sometimes I project my humanity onto non-human entities like pets, cars, and houses. I’m not my pet. Yet, I can imagine how my pet feels. Thus I turn different species into same species as me. As for my car… well, just don’t hurt her, okay?

I’m grateful for my ability to span across dimensions of reality simply by imagining it. Wow! What a marvelous tool is imagination! Imagine what you could do with it. I’m wandering through realms of wonder right now…

A Relationship Between Perspective and Intention

Inside my First-Second Degree of Illumination bubble, perspective and intention entwine in a dance I experience as reality. Sometimes that reality doesn’t work out like I think it should. Why don’t things always work like I intend them to?!

Ever felt like that? Perhaps you believe you “did the work” and yet felt it came up short of your expectation. You might be becoming aware of the relationship between your perspective and your intention.

Suppose your general outlook on life determines that life is dangerous. Setting an intention to accomplish this or that will fit within that life view. In this case, perspective has a limiting effect on intention. Life partner relationships are often based on this limitation even when the intention of the union is for each partner to live in the boundless joy experienced early in the relationship. Over time, limiting perspective shrinks the power of their conscious intention.

Perspective might be expressed as “the source of perception” or my “come from.” When I come from a place of fear, I’ll see things as threats. When I change that “come from” to one of grateful acceptance, threats tend to turn into opportunities and information.

Intention aligned with a perspective manifests as reality. You might also say that I manifest intention from a (one) perspective. What happens to manifestation within an interpersonal relationship? Within a group? How does a couple or group manifest their intention when each single perspective plays such a critical role in the outcome?

About Agreement

I have several competing perspectives in my mind at any given time. Perhaps I want to go to the store to buy something. One part of me says, “Yeah, you need that item.” Another may suddenly shout out, “Wait a minute! Your bank account says otherwise. Let’s wait a bit.” Yet another may chime in, “You don’t really need that.” And etc. I’m seldom of one voice and one mind. My mind has several perspectives – each of which influence my intentions.

In order to get anything done, I must come to some kind of agreement between all the competing perspectives within me. Then I can present my inner agreement to my life partner. She’ll go through the same process I did to come to some sort of inner agreement – her perspective. Sometimes my or her inner agreement is not actually an agreement at all – the loudest or most certain voice (“Mr. I. M. Right”) simply spoke for all. In that case, counter-behaviors would belie the inner conflict and my “good intentions” would sabotage my efforts.

About Communication

Communicating from a perspective as an interrelation between an object and the subject viewing it, how entwines with why, affecting outcomes. For example, when I take an interest in an object, my perspective of it may apply one or more justification filters (“why” or “why not” intentions) to add value to my interest. This manipulation of value can influence choices that affect future intentions and present perspectives. The more I understand about myself, the clearer my viewpoint and intentions become over time.

Why Oh Why?!!

Infants and very young children have only one intention – to live. At a certain age, just about every child goes through a “Why” stage in which they ask others about their intentions, “Why did you do that, Mommy?” Children are born with conflicting perspectives – some from Mom and some from Dad and maybe some they can call their own. As they grow up, they encounter the perspectives of many others, some more influential than others. By the time I arrived at adulthood, I had encountered many, many perspectives that affected my intentions. Today, “my” perspectives are literally those of all perspectives – in ONE.

As I get to know myself, I wield the power of awareness of my perspective through intention into manifestation. From that perspective everything that happens is as I intend. How much of that I’m aware of is up to me.

The Transformation Option

I make lots of choices. Most concern defense of what I already believe and know.  Inside my First-Second Degree of Illumination safety bubble, my choices seem real: What will I have for breakfast? Will I drive or walk to the store? What will I wear to the party? These are choices of defense: Which defense feels like it satisfies my needs at this time? Yet, all these apparent choices freeze my conscious awareness well within the bubble. One day, I realize I want to explore what might exist outside my ever-shrinking bubble. I seek transformation. How might I do that?

A Transformation Catalyst

Inside the bubble, my attention is focused on defense in its many guises. When challenged, I’m ready! Defensiveness kept my ancestors alive when they lived on the plains of Africa and their neighbors considered them food. Today I lock my doors and pay for a police force to protect me and mine. Millions of years of no change.

Consider what that fear thought train does to me. It sets me up to live within an ever-shrinking bubble of fear and justified wariness. Since I’m keen to spot danger – and I assume my neighbors live with the same fearfulness – I protect myself and my family from everyone else to the degree that we’ve become dangerous to each other. Fear continues to breed fear, generating rings within rings of ever-solidifying defense. Safety first and always!

To break out of that limitation bubble, I must deal with my defenses. Formidable as they are, there must be some way to get past them. Perhaps a catalyst.

A chicken egg has a hard crust to protect what’s inside from outside influence. Great defense! And yet, as long as the shell remains intact, I get no omelet for breakfast. So, I apply a catalyst that conflicts with the shell. I strike the egg against the fry pan. The defense gives way and the contents become available for me to create a tasty omelet. Breached defense resulted in an omelet for breakfast.

At the point of impact, the egg was faced with a conflict. As long as the egg remained undisturbed, it would remain an egg, its contents forever locked up. In overcoming the egg’s defense, I offered the egg another option – to become something else. Transformation!

I define transformation as a thorough or dramatic change that remains after the action of a catalyst. The change affects all levels of consciousness though usually appears in the physical and psychological levels.

The Transformation Option

Sometimes in my life, things seem to be going my way. Important people agree with me, my food agrees with me, I agree with me – I feel like I’m on track. No challenges. All quiet on the western front, so to speak. Egg shell intact, safe. I don’t realize it yet, that while I’m busy attending to my sense of well-being, a transformation is forming. Why?

When we were a younger couple, we cared for our little children. They tended to make noise, which helped us know where they were and to some degree what they were up to. When things got quiet, we’d ask each other, “Where are the children?” Meaning – “What are they up to?” Quiet was usually an indicator that we should go check on them!

Peace – meaning the absence of conflict – may be an indicator that I’m solidly within my safety zone, the bubble, primed and ready for a challenge to my defenses. Perfect time to “check on the children” – to seek out and find the transformation option. Scary? Yes, when viewed from behind “the wall” of my fears. No, when viewed beyond fear, as one would in the realm of awakened consciousness in which one realizes the illusion of fear.

Getting past my fear barrier may mean cracking my protective egg shell. That may mean facing such fears as embarrassment, ridicule, wrongness, and defeat. Or, it may simply mean getting over my need to be right all the time. I have many relationships that offer a plethora of opportunities for conflict. Each conflict offers me options, one of which is the transformation option. Will I recognize it when I see it? Will I choose it when I recognize it? I wonder…

  • What’s on the other side of my shell?
  • How will I get past my fear that keeps me inside my shell?
  • Why do I fear transformation?
  • Who will enjoy that delicious omelet on the other side of my fears?

How I Morph a Want into a Need Feed

And what I can do about it!

“When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful…” (Eric Thomas – AKA ET The Hip Hop Preacher)

This new age saying is nothing new. It expresses the concept that we must fight to accomplish anything of value. That value determines the worth of people, things, thoughts, and behaviors. That success for one means defeat for another. Success and failure are measured in terms of value. To be of value, one must succeed. These concepts live within the First-Second Degree of Illumination bubble awareness.

I have values. I value my own opinion and those of certain others who agree with me. Certain activities carry value for me. I use value to assist me in judging, comparing, balancing, and separating. I even use value to evaluate values. Everything in my world has a value to me – usually experienced in terms of importance.

The value of a perception of threat must rise to a certain level of importance to me before I invest in defense. That threshold allows me to prioritize my thoughts and behaviors, saving precious life force energy. After all, defense is a feed, a draw on life force energy. So, the fewer times I have to call upon defense, the more energy I have available for useful (to me) work.

While appearing to provide value, defense diminishes the resources required to satisfy the need for which it was invoked. Therefore, I tend to have few needs compared to wants. And needs tend to elicit far more value than wants. Unless, that is, I transform a lower-value want into a higher-value need.

When want-fulfillment becomes more important than the lives and properties of those involved, a want transforms into a need and a feed is born! That feed includes the want-turned-need and its satisfaction through forced attainment and contrived justification. A value-elevated want can justify the feed that justifies a need and the actions taken to satisfy it.

Turning a Want into a Need Feed

I’ve expressed personal worth in terms of comparative value – “You’re a better man than I am.” I may define strength of will as a comparable value as well – “You’re so much stronger than I am.” When these values climb to need levels, I hear things like, “You’re the best man for the job!” and, “You’re the strongest person I know!” These are setups for need feeds!

By assigning value, I can morph a non-physical want into a physical quest for survival. The higher the value I assign to a want, the more specific the object of my desire must be. That “must be” is how I turn a want into a need.

In elevating a want into a need, I simplify my choices – by narrowing acceptable outcomes. Needs tend to narrow choices to one – simple. Wants tend to allow more options. For example, “I want a drink” allows many forms of satisfaction, “Yeah, a coke will do.” “I need a drink” means only whiskey will do. Simple non-choice default, the implication of which is, “I can’t live without it” – thus, the need feed!

Although elevating a want to need status can energize my mind and heart into working together to provide the value I seek in satisfaction, my mind and heart will feel the result of a need feed.

When turning a want into a need, I might ask myself how important are the specifics of each answer:

What do I want? (the objective)
How do I get it? (the strategy)
Why do I need it? (the want-need switch)
Who am I that needs this? (my self-image in this case)

How might I recover the energy of a want-turned-need?

I like to listen for the words, “need”, “must”, “can’t”, “have to”, “only”, and “should” to help me identify my need feeds. When I hear one, I think to myself, “What do I actually need in this situation?” and notice how this changes the energy of my situation.

How Fear Feeds on Attention

Inside my First and Second degree bubble, everything lives by satisfying needs. An unsatisfied need can trigger a sense of suffering, which can present as fear. The more attention I pay to a need, the more energy I invest in its satisfaction because I fear suffering.

Could fear be the result of imagining what might happen if a need isn’t satisfied? In this way, could fear feed on my attention? Might I create a feed situation when what I give attention to turns into an unsatisfied need? Could I be causing my own suffering?

My fear-need process seems to be a circular awareness path in which I:

  1. …sense an unsatisfied need and then –>
  2. fear suffering because of it and then –>
  3. pay attention to the fear and so –>
  4. take ineffective action that falls short of satisfaction and –>
  5. pay some emotional energy and–>
  6. return awareness back to item 1 above…

Unfulfilled needs lead to fear of suffering that leads to unfulfilled needs that lead to more fear. Note how often I pay in the cycle above. Pay, pay, pay – feed, feed, feed. Out of control – it’s a fear feeding frenzy!

Perhaps fear is like a parasite, feeding on its host’s energy through attention. Could fear prize attention as its reward? As I seek to satisfy my need to avoid suffering, might I draw more suffering by attending to the demands of fear? Am I evolving according to the fears I attend to most?

How does fear feed on attention?

Perhaps an analogy might assist in the understanding how fear feeds on attention.

Fire fighters pull up to a burning building. A window in an adjacent building reflects the raging fire. The fire chief erroneously points his crew’s hose at the reflection rather than at the burning building. Obviously, the water poured on the window fails to extinguish the fire. Despite the amount of water the fire fighters apply to the window, the fire continues to grow. The greater the fire grows, the greater the image in the window and the more the fire fighters’ attention to it.

The fire fighters are doing what they know is the right thing to do even though their efforts are ineffective. Until the chief questions their actions, he may not recognize the error. A very wet window and a very burned-down building will be the result.

Fighting Ghosts

How many times have I done what I knew would work and felt the sting of frustration when it didn’t?!! Maybe I was hosing down a window – a reflection. Perhaps my fear is a reflection that draws my precious attention away from effective action. The image of what I feared sucked my energy away from taking effective action on the object of that fear.

How do I beat my fears? One, perhaps useful, way is to recognize them for what they are: ghosts, figments of imagination, reflections. Unreal. No matter what I fear, that fear is a ghost – not the object it reflects. No amount of attention poured on the fear window will put out the fire it reflects.

Like the fire chief who directs his forces at the window while the building burns down, I can continue to attend to my fears as I have – enjoying a fullness of frustration. Or I might reconsider by recognizing the ghost for what it is – a reflection – and asking, “What else?”

  • What unfulfilled need does this fear reflect to me?
  • How do I feel about that need? (particularly, where and how in my body do I feel it?)
  • Why is my attention drawn to this need (and not another)?
  • Who has the power of intention to redirect their attention? (I do!)